Minimum Spend Increases to $3,000 on the Barclays Arrival Plus World MasterCard

| Updated: August 24, 2018
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Update: This offer is expired, please check the bank’s website for current offers.

As I wrote about on Monday, the minimum spend which was set to increase very soon on the Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard®, went into effect today. Currently the offer is for 40,000 miles after spending $3,000 in the first 90 days.

Link: Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard®

Barclaycard-Arrival-Plus(167x105)

Here are the complete offer details:

  • Earn 40,000 bonus miles when you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 90 days — that’s enough to redeem for a $400 travel statement credit
  • 0% intr APR for 12 months for each Balance Transfer made within 45 days of account opening. After that, a variable APR currently 14.99% or 18.99%, depending on your creditworthiness.
  • Earn 2X miles on all purchases – Miles don’t expire as long as your account is open, active and in good standing
  • Chip card for increased confidence and convenience to pay abroad as easily as you do at home
  • Redeem your miles for travel statement credits – redemptions start at 2,500 miles for $25 toward travel purchases made in the last 120 days
  • Get 10% miles back to use toward your next redemption every time you redeem for travel statement credits
  • No foreign transaction fees on anything you buy while in another country
  • Complimentary online FICO® Credit Score access for Barclaycard Arrival cardmembers

Barclays likely increased the spending requirement on the Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard® to align itself more closely with their biggest competitor, the Chase Sapphire Preferred. The 40,000 bonus was generous with the previously lower spending requirement, but even with the new $3,000 minimum spend it’s one of my favorite travel rewards credit cards.

Earn 2.28% Back on Every Dollar

There is a lot of chit-chat going around about how the Barclays Arrival Card actually earns 2.28% back when you take the total card earnings into account. This is true, but an overly complicated way to look at it what you’re getting. You do earn 2.28% per dollar spent once you have miles in your account and complete the entire process of redeeming a travel purchase.

With that said it basically breaks down like this on a $100 travel purchase:

  1. Have 10,000 arrival miles in your account
  2. Make a $100 travel purchase and earn 200 miles
  3. Redeem 2,000 arrival miles for said $100 travel purchase
  4. Earn 1,000 arrival miles back (10% rebate)
  5. You now earned 2,200 arrival miles through the process of redeeming miles on that $100 travel purchase
  6. Thus your net use of arrival miles is 8,800 for $100 worth of free travel
  7. $100 / 8,800 arrival miles = ~1.14 cent per arrival mile

For big spenders and individuals that use manufactured spend methods, the increased spending requirement won’t make a big difference, but for lower spenders it could make the card harder meet the minimum spend on several cards at a time. There are many powerful ways to help meet a minimum spend and using Amazon Payments is an easy way to ‘spend’ $1,000 per month for free.

The bottom line is that the Barclaycard Arrival Plus™ World Elite MasterCard® is still a great card, but now has a higher $3,000 spending requirement.

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